Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Center for Genetic Medicine

Robert M Lavker, PhD

Robert M Lavker, PhD

Jack W. Graffin, M.D. Research Professor

Professor of Dermatology

Contact

312/695-8106

Ward Building Room 9-124
303 E Chicago Avenue
Chicago IL 60611

Education and Certification

PhD: Clemson University, Nutrition (1968)
Postdoctoral Fellowship: Boston University (1969)

Interests

Description of Interests

The laboratory focuses on the biology of epithelial stem cells and the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating epithelial homeostasis. In collaboration with Tung-Tien Sun (NYU Medical School), the lab identified and characterized stem cells of the epidermis, hair follicle and corneal epithelium. We have demonstrated that the hair follicle stem cells (located in the bulge region of the follicle) are pluripotent; capable of forming the hair shaft as well as the epidermis. Collectively, these studies have been of major importance for their implications regarding tissue regeneration, hair follicle growth, and carcinogenesis. Initial investigations on microRNAs (miRNAs) focused on corneal epithelial-preferred miRNAs. Specifically, miR-205 undergoes a unique form of regulation through an interaction with the corneal-preferred miR-184 to maintain SHIP2 levels. Recently, the lab has demosntrated that miR-31 targets factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (FIH-1). FIH-1 impairs epithelial differentiation via attenuation of Notch signaling. Our results define a previously unknown mechanism for keratinocyte fate decisions where Notch signaling potential is, in part, controlled through a miR-31/FIH-1 nexus. We have also shown that miR-31 targets FIH-1 to positively regulate corneal epithelial glycogen metabolism, which results in the accumulation of glycogen. Increased glucose in the form of glycogen may be a mechanism by which the corneal epithelium is able to withstand periods of hypoxia during eyelid closure or extended contact lens wear. Thus miR-31 may function as a novel means if protecting the corneal epithelium from hypoxic stress. Most recently, the laboratory has defined the microRNA expression patterns of the stem cell-enriched limbal basal cells and has begun to identify targets that are unique to the limbal epithelium. This should lead to an understanding of how miRNAs regulate epithelial stem cells.

Interests (Keywords)

Cancer: Skin; Cell Biology; Cutaneous Biology; Gene Regulation; Hair; Ophthalmology; Stem Cells

Research and Publications

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